Friday, September 20, 2013

Friday Question

My long time gaming friend +Rob Conley wrote a post of how he would explain the OSR to a novice.  His explanation is accurate, but I think too long.  If I was a novice and someone was explaining something to me I would have glazed over.

So my challenge to you dear questioneers, how would YOU explain the OSR to someone?

I think mine would be and this is off the top of my head.

OSR is old D&D.  When it was more about being inventive than knowing the rules.  Just grab some dice, if you don't have any I've got a mound of them.  You make up a character and we start playing.  If you want to do something let me know and we'll figure it out.  The only three rules I have in my game are, 1. Don't be a dick.  2. Have fun.  3.  The last coke in the fridge is always mine.

So how would you bring someone over to the OSR side?

21 comments:

  1. I think your's is pretty good. I think it could even be paired down to the first two sentences and I might add: "in this sort of game what's written on you character sheet in no way describes all the things your character can do."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's so hard to really get a good definition just because people will understand in different ways. I always default with, let's play, I'll show you how it works.

      Delete
  2. I like your take! I wonder about "D&D-centricity." Is D&D part of the definition of OSR? Maybe it is. As a practical matter, it's probably true. Epecially useful in explaining it to someone. But I like Conley's mentioning that "most" games are fantasy genre. My ideal would be something like the average of yours and his I guess.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Reason I use D&D is it's a term most will recognize and have an idea of what its about, good or bad.

      Delete
  3. "You pretend to be a human, elf or dwarf, using funky dice."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm pretending to be human right now.

      Delete
    2. Good thing you don't need a skill role, as it we are talking OSR. Nothing like failing at being human.

      Delete
  4. OSR is to gamers what a 57' Chevy is to a car guy. Sure, the new models are slicker, with lots of bells and whistles. But there's something to be said for cruising in that classic. It's just a different kind of experience. Not inherently better, not inherently worse. Just different.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Depending on whether we're talking about a total RPG novice, or just someone new to old-school games, it seems there ought to be some mention of "rulings, not rules" but I'm not sure how you'd say that without a player, more used to rules covering nearly every eventuality, having some sort of knee-jerk reaction.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most of the time when I want to get someone interested the hardest concept is having them understand it is not a me vs. you game.

      Delete
    2. It is not me versus you? Well, that sucks. I've been playing in wrong all these years. That is what I get for not reading Holmes more carefully before I started. I have been playing as if I have a personal vendetta against everyone else. Now I will have to rethink it all...crap.

      Delete
  6. "It's a game of make-believe that uses dice to see if you hit the guy, instead of arguments."

    I think I'll put that into Pylon, the game engine I'm writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pylon, you hitting in my Land of the Lost heart.

      Delete
  7. OSR is old-style D&D. One person is the referee, while the others play. You (a player) pretend to be a warrior, wizard, priest or thief (and either human, elf, dwarf or hobbit). The referee presents you with situations in a fantasy world, and you tell the referee what you say and do in those situations – this can be anything you want. The referee interprets how your words and actions affect the situation. As the situation changes, shaped by your actions, you tell him what you say and do again in the new circumstances. Wash and repeat. Only the referee actually has to know the rules – and even then, the rules are few and designed primarily to help the referee make fair judgements when determining how your words and actions affect the world.

    BTW, Tim: don't rules 1 and 3 in your original post contradict each other? LOL.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops, should be "rinse and repeat"

      Delete
    2. No 1 and 3 do not. Years ago when they used to play at my place I had a fridge stocked with coke. I told them they could have as much as they liked, but the last one in there was always mine.

      Delete
    3. Just funnin' with ya. ;)

      Your rule makes perfect sense to me.



      Delete
  8. My cousin and I became just simply deliberating your extremely theme, he?ersus continually endeavouring to prove myself incorrect. Your take on it is amazing and in what ways I find myself. I at the mailed my buddy these pages to demonstrate your ex your existing check out. Immediately after missing your site We rescued and you will be finding their way back to read simple things a persons revisions!
    Cccam Server | Best Cccam Server | Cardsharing Server | Best cardsharing

    ReplyDelete